Website History

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On March 13, 1995, KINY Radio became the first commercial business in Alaska to have a permanent Internet presence when our first web page went online -- it was the debut edition of the Juneau Newsminute, forerunner of the Juneau Daily News.

In those early days of the web, very few people had web browsers; most were using text-based Internet access and there were few links or graphics. The Juneau Newsminute came about when KINY's Chris Burns contacted the University of Alaska Southeast's computer guru Mike Ciri about the concept of publishing local news on one of the campus network servers. Mike readily accepted the idea, did all the necessary technical work, and had us up and running. Chris then started uploading the news each day via telephone modem from the KINY Newsroom to a UAS network computer -- that connection put the Juneau Newsminute directly on the Internet for anyone on the planet to read.

Of course, in March of 1995, there weren't very many people with Internet connections. So, the next breakthrough didn't come until a few weeks later when Chris was contacted by Barbara Berg at the Juneau Public Library. Barbara asked if the Juneau Newsminute could appear on SLED, the Statewide Library Electronic Doorway. Chris immediately agreed and KINY's daily news page was soon available throughout Alaska on Internet-connected computers at local and state libraries, public schools and university campuses.

Since our first page blinked onto the monochrome screens of those archaic computer monitors over a decade ago, online technology and the KINY Internet presence have expanded tremendously. Our website has grown from the page below to what it is today, offering a wide range of features and services (most suggested by listeners): in-depth local, state and world news, audio newscasts, a weekly poll, a comprehensive weather station, webcams, information for travelers, local entertainment and recreation calendars, boating and fishing pages, book previews, a complete Internet research center, access to community groups and state agencies, an on-air program guide, air-staff profiles and direct feedback to our studios.

Here is our first posted web page from March 13, 1995, in its original form (and the way it appeared on those then-dominant green monochrome monitors):
 

 
JUNEAU NEWSMINUTE By Chris Burns

03/13/95 Monday (c)1995 Alaska-Juneau Communications

*THE JUNEAU BOROUGH ASSEMBLY TONIGHT WILL REVIEW THE REGULATIONS GOVERNING COMMERCIAL USE OF CITY TRAILS. ASSEMBLY MEMBER TOM GARRETT SAYS THE REGULATIONS SIGNED BY CITY MANAGER MARK PALESH CONTAIN POLICY DECISIONS WHICH SHOULD HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE ASSEMBLY. THE RULES ARE SUPPOSED TO TAKE EFFECT THIS FRIDAY.

*JUNEAU REPRESENTATIVE KIM ELTON SAYS THERE IS MORE POLITICS THAN POLICY BEHIND A BILL INTRODUCED BY SENATOR RANDY PHILLIPS OF EAGLE RIVER LAST WEEK. PHILLIPS' BILL WOULD MOVE THE LEGISLATURE TO ANCHORAGE IN 1997. WHILE PHILLIPS SAYS HE OFFERED THE MEASURE AFTER POLLING HIS CONSTITUENTS, ELTON SAYS IT COULD ALSO BE TERMED AS "SUCKING UP" TO HIS CONSTITUENTS. ELTON SUGGESTING IF THAT'S THE CASE, MAYBE SOMEWHERE HALFWAY BETWEEN JUNEAU AND ANCHORAGE WOULD WORK -- LIKE CAPE SUCKLING.

*THE CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT, B.C., IS KICKING IN $10,000 IN U.S. FUNDS TO THE MARKETING EFFORTS OF THE ALASKA MARINE HIGHWAY SYSTEM. THE MONEY WILL BE USED TO CREATE BROCHURES HIGHLIGHTING THE LINKS BETWEEN OUR STATE FERRIES, AND THEIR PROVINCIAL VESSEL SYSTEM. PRINCE RUPERT HAS BEEN A TERMINUS FOR ALASKA FERRIES FOR THE PAST 32 YEARS.

*IF YOU'VE WONDERED WHAT KIND OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT SPENT YOUR BOND ISSUE MONEY ON, TONIGHT'S YOUR CHANCE TO TAKE A LOOK. A WORKING DISPLAY WILL BE SET UP AT AUKE BAY ELEMENTARY BEGINNING AT 7:00 IN THE COMPUTER LAB. LAST YEAR'S BOND ISSUE WAS DESIGNED TO UPGRADE COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AT ALL JUNEAU SCHOOLS, AND THERE WILL BE SPECIAL DISPLAYS AT EACH ONE IN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS.

*IT'S THE END OF AN ERA FOR SOME OLDER TECHNOLOGY USED BY THE COAST GUARD OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS OR SO -- MORSE CODE STATIONS ARE GOING THE WAY OF THE TYPEWRITER AND OTHER OUTDATED TECHNOLOGY. THE LAST HIGH FREQUENCY MORSE STATIONS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN KODIAK, ARE GOING OFF THE AIR ON APRIL 1ST. THE COAST GUARD SAYS NEW SATELLITE, EPRIB AND OTHER TECHNOLOGY IS MUCH BETTER AND HAS BEEN TOTALLY ACCEPTED BY THE MARITIME COMMUNITY.

*TIRED OF THE STANDARD GOLD-AND-BLUE ALASKA LICENSE PLATE? WELL, TWO NEW VANITY PLATES ARE NOW AVAILABLE FEATURING DIFFERENT COLORS AND DESIGNS. ONE HAS A MOUNTAIN SCENE, THE OTHER A CARIBOU WITH THE BIG DIPPER AND NORTH STAR. THE PLATES COST $30.